What constitutes sport…

A mixed bag of curiosities to pique the interest of  @Twitter ‘#andanotheronegone’, otherwise known as Cheshire & Co.  I was intrigued to learn that some people are calling for ‘gaming’ to be considered an Olympic sport.  In my opinion (and I am level pegging with Solomon on most things, although I might just edge him on Tottenham Hotspur, the back catalogue of Cliff Richard, the exact script of The Godfather and the best way to artex a ceiling), but sport is an activity that requires specialist footwear and an increase in one’s heart rate; hence why lap dancing makes it onto the list.  What might lessen the argument for those looking to see avatars fighting it out alongside Greco-Roman wrestling, the decathlon and er, rhythmic gymnastics is the tragic tale of the Taiwanese gamer who was found dead in a gaming café just outside Beijing having hardly slept or eaten in a ’40 hour session’.  I can empathise…after a session lasting that long I would need a lie down in a darkened room with a week’s supply of tea and jam tarts having given Tatiana strict instructions that I was not to be disturbed.  The information superhighway has a lot to answer for; from the skewing of the Olympic ideal to house buying.  This week we received a call from a gentleman citing himself as a potential buyer who had taken, “a very close look” at one of our properties listed on Rightmove.  This forensic examination had taken place using the formidable tool that is the internet and he now wished to view the property for real.  He then launched into a plethora of reasons as to why he didn’t like the property, including the colour of the kitchen, “that will have to change” and “who put the patio doors in? They will have to go”.  As well they might-when he has bought the property.  One of our team suggested that there was little point in him viewing the house as he obviously didn’t like it.  Oh no, he countered, “I won’t pay anything close to the asking price, but I might as well have a look”.  Strange, we get paid for selling properties, not offering guided tours of them.

Pointing out the obvious was the characteristic of an article in Friday’s Daily Mail by Graham Norwood, imploring potential purchasers to get, “sales savvy”.  Apparently-and I am staggered by the revelation-“dirty net curtains…run-down communal areas…mould or damaged or rotting windows are the most common tell-tale signs of a poorly kept property”. Well knock me down with a Quaver (other brands of crisp are available and may be more effective as a battering tool).  Further sage advice was offered by Linda Jeffcoat of Stacks Property Search, who opined that, “external factors such as noisy neighbours, all night traffic…nearby late night food joints are valid negotiating tools”.  Actually, I would say that these were factors that may well cause you to walk quickly in the opposite direction.  A professional estate agent would have allowed for all these things when valuing the property at the outset.